Blogging Bayport Alameda

September 15, 2022

Interests that are special

Filed under: Alameda — Lauren Do @ 6:05 am

You should be seeing ads running in the Alameda Sun any day now since A Better Alameda has just had a flurry of checks written to them by the usual suspects. In addition to the $5000 which was made out to A Better Alameda when they were opposing everyone (including Paul B) they now have brought in quite a bit more cash to “better” Alameda.

Given the demographic of these contributors I think this is less about “bettering” Alameda rather than trying to keep it exactly the same or as close to 1973 as possible.

Unsurprisingly there is some overlap between Alamedans with enough money to throw $1000 to A Better Alameda and those with money to throw $1000 to Trish Spencer’s campaign:

How much money do you need to throw down per election to be considered a “special interest”?

10 Comments »

  1. How much money do you need to throw down per election to be considered a “special interest”?

    —–

    One man’s opinion: It’s not size of the checks that determines if a person or group is a “special interest,” it’s the goal. A special interest is a party looking for a cash ROI from a campaign contribution.

    Comment by dave — September 15, 2022 @ 7:55 am

    • Like and individual landlord hoping to have rent control repealed? Or perhaps a homeowner concerned with maintaining their property values? If you are donating because you care about preserving your street parking or time losses due to congestion from a growing population, is there are monetary values associated with those priorities? How do you draw the line?

      Comment by cw — September 15, 2022 @ 8:43 am

  2. Like and individual landlord hoping to have rent control repealed? Or perhaps a homeowner concerned with maintaining their property values? If you are donating because you care about preserving your street parking or time losses due to congestion from a growing population, is there are monetary values associated with those priorities? How do you draw the line?

    Comment by cw — September 15, 2022 @ 8:44 am

    • I draw the line at city funds. Overturning rent control can be a monetary benefit to landlords, but they aren’t after tax dollars.

      Comment by dave — September 15, 2022 @ 9:52 am

  3. As in the past few elections, the Alameda chapter of the League of Women Voters will be aggregating campaign contributions to candidates and independent expenditure committees into easy-to-read graphs and charts after each election filing. Included will be tables detailing contributions of $1,000 or more and what independent expenditure committees spend for and against candidates. Information on past elections is available at https://www.lwvalameda.org/alameda-campaign-finance-review.html. The first postings for the current election will be up in early October.

    Comment by Allan Mann — September 15, 2022 @ 8:58 am

  4. Like the owner of a Harbor Bay medical firm who contributed $40,000 to the poorly conceived Measure Z campaign?

    Like the Indian casinos, developers and public employee unions who overwhelmingly contributed to both Bontas drowning their political opposition.

    By the way, Bonta spent about $1 million of his donation money on his Republican opponent, Eric Early, thinking he would be easier to defeat in the general election. Early lost. Now Bonta refuses to debate the winner, Nathan Hochman.

    That’s not democracy.

    Comment by Mirror — September 15, 2022 @ 9:01 am

  5. As someone who’s done campaign finance analyses in the past, this is always fascinating to me. You have someone like Trish who says she’s for the people, and gets 90% of her donations from individuals. But you realize most of them are from very wealthy individuals who can afford to throw away $1,000s. Then you have candidates like Malia Vella and Jim Oddie who do not have a rich base of support. They do get a lot of support from the working class, who pool their resources into unions who then contribute to the candidates. It’s always bizarre to me that having the support of unions is supposed to be worse than having the support of several rich individuals, but that’s what happens every election.

    Comment by JRB — September 15, 2022 @ 9:09 am

    • Virtually the only unions contributing too Alameda candidates are local chapters of which 100% of the members are city employees or chapters of locals who want city contracts to have clauses requiring union labor. Their leaders openly speak in favor or against specific votes in the city council meetings purely on the latter contract issue. Many of these union members are not even residents of Alameda, so there can be only one reason they want their “pooled” money going to a city council candidate.

      BTW, I plan to vote for Oddie because I think he will to a terrific job in spite of any union support.

      Comment by Union political infuence — September 15, 2022 @ 1:28 pm

      • Honest not sure if that post gets a “bless your heart” or a “well played, excellent trolling.”

        Comment by dave — September 15, 2022 @ 5:25 pm

  6. look at it this way, A.B.A. and Trish have at least six votes so far. thier doing so well.

    Comment by Bidenismypresident — September 15, 2022 @ 10:31 am


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