Blogging Bayport Alameda

January 10, 2022

More than this. (This = A/26)

Filed under: Alameda — Lauren Do @ 6:20 am

Despite Tony Daysog confidently announcing after the Measure Z vote that:

So people are concerned about a multi-family overlay on Harbor Bay Landing, well there’s not going to be a multi-family overlay on Harbor Bay Landing. There’s not going to be a multi-family overlay on the Harbor Bay sports facility and there’s not going to be — there might be a multi-family — there’s not going to be a multi-family overlay on South Shore Center. Those areas just are not strategic as they do not, they are not conducive to transit planning. [emphasis added]

Tonight’s Planning Board meeting is considering exactly the opposite of what Tony Daysog predicted in December of 2020: a new overlay of the multi-family variety for Alameda’s shopping centers. The new shopping center overlay will make housing above 30 du/ac by right on all the shopping centers in Alameda. A lot of those parcels I identified in this post from December 2020. From the staff report:

Staff proposes adoption of a new “overlay district” for each shopping center site.  Although each site would still be governed by its current zoning, the new “Community Mixed Use Multi-family Residential Combining District” would override or supersede specific provisions of the current zoning provisions to encourage and facilitate housing construction.   The new district would: 

•                     Permit multifamily housing by right, including shared housing, transitional housing, supportive housing, senior assisted living, and low barrier navigation centers;

•                     Require that all new residential and mixed use buildings be at least 30 units per acre (net) and permit up to 100 units per net acre, with the ability to transfer density between adjacent parcels; 

•                     Prohibit ground floor residential use to ensure a commercial mixed use environment;

•                     Respect the current height limits in the base zoning, unless those limits are less than 60 feet, in which 60 feet becomes the maximum height limit.  (60 feet allows for a five story building with ground floor commercial or service uses.)

While the big part of this proposed overlay will permit multi family housing by right on these parcels in direct contradiction to A/26, the other major part of the ordinance will serve to reinforce the existing height limits for the parcels themselves as well. Remember earlier last year Tony Daysog was trying to draw lines in the sand, in the case that his “no MF overlay mantra” somehow didn’t materialize, around shopping centers, how acreage was counted and height limits. Despite commercial zoning having its own height limits he thought that the residential zoning height limits ported over the the commercial zone if housing was being built. It was a funny bit of Tony Daysog logic which defied the sensible.

Most of the shopping centers are zoned C-something which has a maximum height limit of 100 feet which is around eight stories.

And remember despite people pushing back pre and immediately post Measure Z about overlaying the shopping centers (go back and check if you were one of the people arching their brow at staff laying the groundwork for this in Nov/Dec 2020), now even AAPS is saying yes to shopping centers becoming exempt to A/26. I have to say I’m quite enjoying watching all these about faces on these issues, I can’t wait until Tony Daysog and Trish Spencer will be forced to take a vote on all of these A/26 workaround to save A/26 for an increasingly smaller number of people and parcels in Alameda.

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