Blogging Bayport Alameda

June 25, 2020

We’re half-day there

Filed under: Alameda — Lauren Do @ 6:05 am

On Tuesday night the School Board voted on the general framework on how to do school for the 2020-2021 academic year.   Essentially we’ll get one option for a limited number of students for fully remote.  This will be entirely self-directed.  The teacher assigned to the student will not actually teach the student but act as a coach.  Instead ready made platform will be used to facilitate the learning.  This will be a full year commitment so you can’t decide to start the program and then try to swap to the other model if the remote-only doesn’t work for your student.

The other option is small cohorts of students in for half a day, four days a week.  This schedule, according to the presentations the other night, will allow for a pivot to remote learning if a full shelter-in-place is activated again.  I believe the elementary cohorts will be 12 students, I don’t know what it is for the middle and high school ones (or how that will even work for high school with so many different schedules and electives).  There’s a lot of details to be sorted out between now and late August.  Parental anxiety will surely not help either.

There is room, according to the presentations from the other night, for concurrent enrollment at the City Colleges, for further enrichment.

Here’s what the typical schedule will look like for elementary, middle, and high school students:

elementary

secondary

The main issue will be child care, particularly for the younger students and parents who don’t have the luxury of having a stay-at-home parent.  Even those with the ability to work from home there’s a vast difference between having a 14 year old and a 5 year old.  This is where the haves and the have-nots will really start to separate itself and where moneyed PTA might be able to fill the child care and enrichment gaps that other schools with less robust PTAs won’t have the ability to do.  Again, there is still much detail to fill in around the approved framework.  It’s definitely a start and I can see a lot being very good about smaller cohort sizes and more focused learning.  I guess we’ll just have to wait and see.

 

6 Comments »

  1. Re: moneyed PTA’s

    It’s been about 5 years since I’ve had any involvement in an elementary PTA or paid child care, so if anyone has fresher numbers, pls update.

    That said, when I was involved with the Edison PTA, reputed to be among the best funded, the average annual revenue was about $300-350 per student. On site after care, organized by Girls Inc, was about $350-400 per month per child. In other words the PTA’s total budget could have funded approximately 1 month for each student while cancelling every other effort, such as field trips etc.

    If those old numbers are still representative of current reality, the ability of any PTA to cover child care is very limited. This is a very difficult situation and I don’t have a ready solution for it, just making the point that PTA power is much less than our blogmistress may think it is.

    And again, if anyone has more current numbers, please chime in.

    Comment by dave — June 25, 2020 @ 11:17 am

    • typo: the average revenue was 400-450/student

      Comment by dave — June 25, 2020 @ 11:19 am

      • That’s crazy. For a West End school, it’s about $100-150 per student.

        Comment by JRB — June 25, 2020 @ 4:35 pm

        • It’s not crazy, it’s the result of very heavy fundraising efforts, LOTS of work.

          But the point is that even the most liquid PTA can do very little to close a full year long funding gap. This is a very difficult situation.

          Comment by dave — June 25, 2020 @ 4:42 pm

  2. Was everyone promoted/advanced whether they did online work or not?

    What about sports, drama, dance, swimming, P.E., art, advanced placement, special education, etc?

    Will AUSD renew their contract with the police department?

    Will they offer bias training to the school staff (mostly Caucasian and female). Will they make moves to bring in more teachers of color? What about changing the curriculum to reflect recent events? How will older teachers/staff and those with high risk factors be protected ( or will they)?

    Many of these recommendations were made by the State Department of Education.

    “The department will also host a series of ethnic studies webinars on the histories and accomplishments of people of color and create curriculum for an ethnic studies class that, if approved, would be required for high school graduation. Bias training will also be made available for all school employees.“

    https://edsource.org/2020/california-school-districts-should-spend-less-on-police-more-on-counselors-state-leaders-say/634450

    Comment by Nowyouknow — June 25, 2020 @ 1:10 pm

  3. “The Trump administration is rebuffing House Democrats’ effort to hear testimony from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Robert Redfield on safely reopening schools during the coronavirus pandemic….

    “The White House offered a similar rationale in May for preventing Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, from testifying before a House Appropriations subcommittee about the government’s response to the pandemic….

    “The House is a set up. The House is a bunch of Trump haters,” Trump said at the time, noting that Fauci would testify before a GOP-controlled Senate committee. “But the House, I will tell you, the House, they should be ashamed of themselves. And, frankly, the Democrats should be ashamed, because they don’t want us to succeed. They want us to fail so they can win an election.”

    https://thehill.com/homenews/house/507876-white-house-blocks-cdc-director-from-testifying-before-house-panel-on

    Comment by MP — July 17, 2020 @ 3:19 pm


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