Blogging Bayport Alameda

May 21, 2020

Trust the voters of today

Filed under: Alameda — Lauren Do @ 6:01 am

I’m a bit behind on my city meeting viewing.  Mainly because I’ve decided that the main way to distract me from all this COVID-19 business is to listen to true crime podcasts.  I’m deep into the back catalog of Dateline NBC episodes.  However, I did take a break from all that in order to listen to the meeting on May 7.  This is the “should we allow the voters of today to revisit a charter amendment which was voted in before some of us were even born.”

From the jump, City Councilmember Tony Daysog wanted a reason why we should change A/26 altogether.  If many many discussion about A/26 and lack of alignment with state law (and therefore being problematic and time consuming for the City to bring into conformance) is not enough to convince him, then I’m fairly sure that Tony Daysog will never hear any argument that will convince him to change A/26.  Tony Daysog has a base he plays to and he’s sticking to them and what they want.  It’s a tactic and it’s very Tony Daysog. But then again, the people who voted for Tony Daysog didn’t vote for him to be politically brave or to even do the right thing based on sound political instincts.  They voted for him because he will always vote for what his old Alameda politics base wants him to do and he always obliges.

Tony Daysog also claimed that Alameda has gotten more ethnically diverse under A/26 which is only true if you lump ALL people of color together.  Based on my demographics tracking, for the population of Blacks and Latinos, Alameda does not (and has never) reflected the population percentage for Alameda County.

According to the 2010 Census Alameda County’s overall Black population was at 12.6%.  The City of Alameda? 7.1%.

According to the 2010 Census Alameda County’s overall Latino population was at 22.5%.  The City of Alameda? 12%.

Where we did over-perform was for Asians, which, as anyone who cares about diversity and diversity politics will tell you is a diverse group within itself and the racial experience in America for Asians is vastly different than for Black and Latino Americans.  It’s pretty insulting for an API man to lump all people of color into one group and say, “yeah because Asians are over-represented we haven’t had any issues with this exclusionary housing policy doing its job and excluding Black and Latino families from Alameda.”

But I think the most troublesome part of the whole agenda item came at the beginning of the meeting when Councilmember Jim Oddie made a motion to essentially not even hear the agenda item.   He did not give a reason but I don’t know what good reason there would be to not hear the item.  As someone who is purportedly fighting to relieve the housing crisis for our more vulnerable communities a motion and vote to not even consider opening discussion to revisit one of the most exclusionary housing laws in the San Francisco Bay Area is mind boggling.

The comments proffered by Jim Oddie of why not to put a A/26 vote on the November ballot were unconvincing and sounded like someone who doesn’t want to run for re-election with an A/26 repeal on the ballot.  If he doesn’t think that today’s voters should be able to consider A/26 then say that.  Any discussion other than that is politics, not leadership.

But now, Jim Oddie has a chance to show us that he’s actually serious about housing equity as the result was for Mayor Marilyn Ezzy Ashcraft and Jim Oddie to form a subcommittee to attempt to bring back something that could go on November’s ballot regarding A/26, depending on the Council majority.  Councilmember Malia Vella was absent from this meeting so we don’t have any signals as to which way she’ll lean, but if she’s true to her previous housing equity positions, giving voters the ability to undo a truly exclusionary housing policy should be an easy vote.

 

4 Comments »

  1. __________ has a base she/he plays to and she/he’s sticking to them and what they want. It’s a tactic and it’s very _________. But then again, the people who voted for ___________ didn’t vote for her/him to be politically brave or to even do the right thing based on sound political instincts. They voted for her/him because she/he will always vote for what his/her __________ Alameda politics base wants him/her to do and he/she always obliges.

    Rinse and repeat.

    Comment by dave — May 21, 2020 @ 6:55 am

  2. “should we allow the voters of today to revisit a charter amendment which was voted in before some of us were even born.”

    Is that an actual argument against Measure A? Most of the City of Alameda regulations were passed before people were born. And it appears that you are also arguing that Asians are not a “real” minority to diffuse a pro measure A talking point- a dangerous argument. Sadly, discrimination against Asians is rising in the Bay Area and around the world due to the virus.

    https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Coronavirus-Asian-Americans-across-Bay-Area-15235380.php

    Comment by Nowyouknow — May 21, 2020 @ 7:36 am

    • Go away.

      Comment by john doe — May 21, 2020 @ 3:44 pm

  3. A/26 needs to go on the ballot, win or lose it will at least show us where the majority of Alameda voters stand on this issue at this point.

    Comment by trumpisnotmypresident — May 21, 2020 @ 8:28 am


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