Blogging Bayport Alameda

July 26, 2016

It’s complicated, continued again

Filed under: Alameda — Lauren Do @ 6:06 am

One of the nice things about that Harvard study is that it has a bunch of policy recommendations. One of the recommendations is about the need to have strong arguments to support funding for affordable housing.

The interesting thing is that the study points out that an emotional argument is not necessarily the most effective as we can see from the discussion around rent stabilization and the lack of empathy for vulnerable renters in fear of losing their shelter.

From the study:

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According to the study all low income/affordable housing federal subsidies is only 1/3 of the amount that is offered to homeowner mortgage deductions.  The study reasons that pointing out this disparity may prove more persuasive than the emotional argument of doing the right thing.

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7 Comments »

  1. “People who are frustrated about the lack of affordable housing may resort to illegal activity, resulting in additional costs of incarceration.”

    Really? What are you in for? “Affordable housing frustration.”

    Comment by Captain Obvious — July 26, 2016 @ 6:50 am

  2. “in addition a household that is not able to secure will likely enter the homeless shelter system”

    ———————————————————-

    So by that rationale we can conclude that people who can’t afford steak will starve instead of switching to chicken.

    Got it.

    Comment by dave — July 26, 2016 @ 7:44 am

  3. How about Detroit? Have any of the whiny renters tried Detroit? You can buy brick houses there for less than $100,000 that are sturdy and warm. According to this website, your monthly payment will be less than $1000. Cost of living there is lower, too.

    http://auctions.buildingdetroit.org/RehabbedAndReady/SplashPage

    What’s wrong with Detroit? Oh, it isn’t in California?

    Comment by vigi — July 26, 2016 @ 9:21 am

  4. It’s not complicated at all:

    “This inquiry has some important limitations.
    First, only one for-profit firm was selected for study and, in addition, only one city in
    which that firm operates was visited.”

    Just pick one N-P firm and one city that meets your study requirements and rest assured someone will ass hume it’s gospel and preach to the choir…after all it is Harvtard.

    Comment by jack — July 26, 2016 @ 9:22 am

  5. The one key word in the statement is “proactive.” Our Federal, State, County and City governments are seldom “proactive” about anything. The disaster has to happen before they recognize the need for action. The “Fragmented States of America” are at war with each other, the same way the Congress is at war with the American public. To be proactive would mean that people care about each other and will sacrifice and compromise for each other. Wealthy people wish the poor people would go away and the poor people wish the rich people would simply notice them. The gap between them is far too wide for us to make progress. Though we talk the talk, as a city, we have yet to walk the walk. Without Bernie and others like him, nothing will change over the next four years.

    Comment by bill2 — July 26, 2016 @ 10:08 am

  6. bill2 or Bill the 2nd Hillary

    This government and nation were built on the “will of the people” (rich and poor) not some “proactive’ dictator like George III or Hussein the first or Bernie the last.

    Comment by jack — July 26, 2016 @ 11:03 am

  7. http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/realestate/why-its-so-hard-to-build-affordable-housing-its-not-affordable/ar-BBuSQBH?li=AA4Zjn&ocid=spartanntp Interesting story on Affordable housing across the US…it is not affordable! The last 2 paragraphs is how I have always understood how it should work:

    There’s also another way to create housing for the poorest renters, which is to build housing for higher wage-earners, freeing up older, lesser-quality units through a process called filtering.

    “It’s not always politically attractive, because you’re talking about housing that has deteriorated a bit,” said Reihan Salam, policy fellow at the National Review Institute. “That’s basically how housing markets have always worked.”

    My parents first house wasn’t a new house with all the bells and whistles, they started out in something which was of “lesser-quality”.

    Comment by joelsf — July 26, 2016 @ 11:08 am


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