Blogging Bayport Alameda

June 20, 2016

Back to the bargaining board

Filed under: Alameda — Lauren Do @ 6:00 am

Unfortunate but it looks like the peace between AUSD and AEA was short lived after the members who voted rejected the bargained contract.

Given that bargaining doesn’t happen until the fall, it’s less clear on whether or not this impasse can be resolved before the election season ramps up and the parcel tax is shopped around.  I would argue that it’s really important to go into a parcel tax election that requires 2/3rd of the vote to pass unified and all on the same page.  This is not going to cut it.

The full press release from AUSD below:

AEA Membership Votes Down Tentative Agreement with AUSD

Alameda, Calif. — June 16, 2016 — Members of the Alameda Education Association (AEA) — which represents certificated employees including teachers, counselors, and nurses — have voted down a tentative agreement (TA) signed with Alameda Unified School District (AUSD) last week.

The union’s current contract expires on June 30, 2016.

“I am saddened AEA members won’t have a new contract on July 1,” said Superintendent Sean McPhetridge. “But I also understand that ultimately this was a complex package deal with several compromises that a majority of AEA members simply found unacceptable. While collectively we tried and failed to find agreement and align interests at this time, I am confident we will work even more closely going forward so we build on contract provisions both sides liked and re-structure those provisions that proved unsatisfactory. We can do it.”

Under the terms of the TA, 3.7% would have been added to the salary schedule. 3.11% of that increase was new money; the remaining .59% was to be re-allocated from members’ dental benefits negotiated in last year’s contract

The new contract also would have reduced class size to 24:1 in transitional kindergarten and kindergarten, increased flexibility in using leave time, provided adjusted prep times to kindergarten teachers transitioning to a full-day program, and provided a process by which class size overages would be addressed. The new contract also created new committees to provide increased AEA voice in district management decisions.

Approximately 70% of the union members who submitted votes voted against the TA.

“It is clear AEA members voiced concern over their working conditions and compensation,” said AEA President Audrey Hyman. “New language about class overages was a point of contention. I understand their concern and am hopeful that, when the two teams resume negotiations in the fall, they will be able to find a resolution that will meet AEA members’ needs.”

The two teams signed the TA just five days after they declared an impasse on June 2. Bargaining will most likely resume in September.

“As Board President, I consider it my responsibility to make sure that the conditions exist for students and staff to flourish,” said Solana Henneberry, president of the AUSD Board of Trustees. “My colleagues on the Board share this same commitment. Occasionally tentative agreements that are recommended are rejected. We will return to the table and craft an agreement with the teachers that will work for instructors, students, and the District. I look forward to finding an agreement that is of benefit to all of us next fall.”

Advertisements

2 Comments »

  1. Agreed.

    If one were trying pick the worst possible two months to have labor strife and one could pick any two months over a five or six or seven year period, one would pick September and October 2016. If peace isn’t restored quickly and the current parcel tax term isn’t extended/renewed this November, it’s going to be very bad for students, teachers, and the schools. It’s hard to see how Humpty Dumpty could be put back together again.

    Comment by Peace — June 20, 2016 @ 6:31 am

    • Agreed +1

      Comment by Basel — June 20, 2016 @ 3:02 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post.

Say what you want

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.