Blogging Bayport Alameda

June 13, 2014

In 75-words or less

Filed under: Alameda, Election, School — Tags: — Lauren Do @ 6:03 am

Even though some folks want the 75 word summaries to be “complete” here are some examples of some of the 75-word summaries for the schools bonds that were voted on in June, what AUSD has done in the past and what it wants to do for future ballot measures is not anything different than what the majority of school bond measures have done and will continue to do:

Bayshore Elementary, passed:

To improve the quality of education; replace outdated heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems; repair deteriorating plumbing systems; modernize classrooms, restrooms, and school facilities; repair or replace leaky roofs; upgrade inadequate electrical systems; and improve student access to computers and modern technology; shall the Bayshore Elementary School District issue $6 million of bonds at legal interest rates, have an independent citizens’ oversight committee, and have NO money used for administrative salaries or be taken by the State?

 

Bellevue Union School District, passed:

To avoid overcrowding, continue to renovate and modernize its aging schools and classrooms, build new classrooms, rehabilitate buildings and grounds, improve energy efficiency, purchase solar panels and equipment, and repair, replace, acquire, construct, and rehabilitate school facilities, shall the Bellevue Union Elementary School District be authorized to issue $12,000,000 in bonds at legal interest rates with no funds for administrator salaries and an Independent Citizens’ Oversight Committee to monitor all bond expenditures?

Cambrian School District, passed:

To reduce classroom overcrowding by providing additional classrooms, support high quality education, enhance school safety and security, update fire and earthquake safety systems, provide access to 21st century learning technology, maximize energy efficiency, repair or replace leaky windows, replace outdated heating/cooling equipment, and build/equip classrooms, facilities, and sites, shall Cambrian School District issue $39 million in bonds at legal rates with citizen oversight, annual audits, no funds for administrators’ salaries and all funds staying local

Contra Costa Community College District, passed

To upgrade educational facilities at Diablo Valley, Contra Costa, and Los Medanos Colleges, and the San Ramon and Brentwood centers, and help prepare students for jobs and college transfer by modernizing classrooms and labs, building facilities for health, medical, science, and technology training, and implementing earthquake safety, accessibility, and infrastructure improvements, shall the Contra Costa Community College District issue $450 million of bonds at legal interest rates with independent oversight, audits, and all funds spent on local sites?

Coronado Unified School District, failed

Protect Quality Education in Coronado Local Measure.
To provide modern classroom technology and facilities students need for college/career success, continue advanced programs in math, science and the arts, acquire, construct and repair classrooms/facilities/sites/equipment, permit smaller classes, and protect Coronado’s quality of education, shall Coronado Unified School District issue up to $29,000,000 in bonds at legal rates, with maturities under 5 years, all bonds repaid by September 30, 2024, less than $13,200,000 outstanding at any time, independent citizen oversight, and all money staying local?

Cotati/Rohnert Park Unified School District, passed:

To protect quality education and student safety with funding that cannot be taken by the State, shall Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District improve classrooms, science labs and school libraries to meet modern academic and safety standards; update classroom computers, instructional technology and infrastructure; and replace outdated and inefficient heating, ventilation, electrical and plumbing systems; by issuing $80 million in bonds, at legal rates,with citizens’ oversight, annual audits, no money for administrators, and all funds staying local?

Culver City Unified School District, passed:

To upgrade and repair Culver City schools and support quality education with funding that cannot be taken away by State government, shall Culver City Unified School District improve classrooms, science labs, computers/learning technology, repair leaking roofs, old plumbing, inadequate electrical systems, and aging school buildings/restrooms, improve school safety, remove hazardous asbestos, make needed seismic repairs, and upgrade, construct, and acquire classrooms, school facilities, sites/equipment, by issuing $106,000,000 in bonds, at legal rates, with independent oversight and audits?

Elk Hills School District, failed:

To improve the quality of education; construct new classrooms and science labs to maintain small class sizes; improve student access to computers and modern technology; improve P.E. fields and facilities; and replace deteriorating water, plumbing and sewer systems; shall the Elk Hills School District issue $7,130,000 of bonds at legal interest, have an independent citizens’ oversight committee and have no money used for administrative salaries, regular, ongoing maintenance, or be taken by the state?

Fremont Unified School District, passed:

To upgrade/repair neighborhood schools with local funding the State cannot take away, shall Fremont Unified School District update technology/aging classrooms, math, science/computer labs for 21st Century learning, upgrade electrical wiring to current safety codes, fix/replace leaky roofs, aging plumbing/restrooms, remove asbestos, repair, construct, acquire equipment, classrooms, sites, facilities, by issuing $650 million of bonds at legal rates, with citizen oversight, no money for administrators, salaries, benefits/pensions, and all funds for Fremont schools?

Golden Plains Unified School District, passed:

NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOL REPAIR, CAREER EDUCATION AND STUDENT SAFETY BOND MEASURE G To improve local schools by improving classrooms, vocational/agricultural job training and technology; fixing deteriorating roofs, bathrooms, plumbing/electrical systems; removing asbestos, mold/lead paint; improving fire safety; and constructing/equipping district facilities/sites shall Golden Plains Unified School District issue $13,000,000 in bonds at legal interest rates, with independent audits, citizens’ oversight, no money for administrators’ salaries/pensions, and all funds used locally?

Gonzales Unified School District, failed:

To improve the quality of education, increase student access to computers, modern technology; construct a new elementary school to reduce student overcrowding; make health, safety and security improvements; modernize, upgrade, and renovate outdated classrooms, restrooms and school facilities; shall the Gonzales Unified School District School Facilities Improvement District No. 1 issue $16,900,000 of bonds at legal rates, have an independent citizens’ oversight committee and NO money for administrative salaries or taken by the State?

Hydesville Elementary School District, passed:

To improve the quality of education with funding that cannot be taken by the State; modernize and renovate outdated classrooms, restrooms and school facilities; replace temporary portables with permanent classrooms; increase student access to computers and modern technology; and improve P.E. fields and facilities for school and community use; shall the Hydesville Elementary School District issue $1,100,000 of bonds at legal interest rates, have an independent citizens’ oversight committee and have NO money used for administrator salaries?

Kingsburg Joint Union High School District, passed:

To improve the quality of education with funding that cannot be taken by the State; improve student access to computers and modern technology; repair/replace leaky roofs; make health, safety and handicapped accessibility improvements; upgrade inadequate electrical systems; and modernize classrooms, restrooms and school facilities; shall the Kingsburg Joint Union High School District issue $13 million of bonds at legal rates, have an independent citizens’ oversight committee and have no money used for administrative salaries, with all funds staying local?

That’s just up to the Ks.   Because I’m getting tired of cutting and pasting, you can look at the rest here.  Of the ones I cut and paste, only one bond measure indicated a length of time, Coronado, and the bond measure failed.

Of the remain 28 ballot measures I did not add above, five measures did not pass and a whopping zero had a duration added to the ballot summary.

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8 Comments

  1. This illustrates exactly why school districts hire & pay slick political consultants to creatively write the ballot language for bonds & taxes-so voters will not immediately appreciate any of the drawbacks of what they are being asked to vote for. So-as you just admitted you did-people get tired of reading the darn things & just go with their general impression = how could anything good for schools be a bad thing?

    Coronado is illustrative. I wonder if they decided not to hire a consultant?

    Comment by vigi — June 13, 2014 @ 9:18 am

  2. So here is an example of 75 word that failed in the June 2014 election with less 50% yes votes.

    To provide Piedmont students and residents with a safe and accessible school theater facility, and to add and renovate classrooms, improve fire/life safety, energy efficiency, and ventilation, and repair/renovate aging structural, mechanical, electrical, and utility systems, shall Piedmont Unified School District issue up to $13,500,000 of bonds at legal rates, with mandatory audits, and citizen oversight?

    Comment by Mike McMahon (@MikeMcMahonAUSD) — June 13, 2014 @ 5:35 pm

  3. And so Mike, if it won’t pass in Piedmont….

    Comment by Puzzled — June 13, 2014 @ 7:16 pm

  4. Jesus 13.5 Mm, that’s chump change to Piedmonters and they verbotened it, yet here in River City we’re going for 10 plus times that, yikes!

    Comment by Jack — June 13, 2014 @ 7:37 pm

  5. And the point many community members have made is to give the voters in River City a chance to vote on this issue.

    Comment by Mike McMahon (@MikeMcMahonAUSD) — June 14, 2014 @ 5:09 am

  6. Shouldn’t the title of this Post be “‘In 75-words or more”, since all of the examples have over 75 words? Course River City denizens can’t count above the distal parts of their limbs so what does it matter.

    Comment by Jack — June 14, 2014 @ 7:41 pm

  7. Ah the vagaries of election law. While technically most the of ballot measures contain more than 75 words here is the reason:

    Word Count: All geographical names shall be counted as one word. Areas that have boundaries and can be mapped are considered geographic areas. For example, “County of Santa Barbara” and “Carpinteria Unified School District” shall each be counted as one word.

    If the governing body does not follow the law properly it subjects itself to legal challenges:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/two-word-error-could-cost-santa-clara-valley-water-district-half-a-billion-dollars-2012-8

    Comment by Mike McMahon (@MikeMcMahonAUSD) — June 15, 2014 @ 8:28 am

  8. Apparently there are more rules about what disqualifies a ‘word’ being a word in bureaucratize than geographical names since Coronado above, has 79 words minus the school name and the numbers but including the title.

    Comment by Jack — June 15, 2014 @ 3:28 pm


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